The World’s Most Dangerous Dams With Spectacular Possiblities From Our Planners Hovering Above Nuclear Plants

We Interrupt Your Favorite Program To Report The 5.4 Quake Near Augusta Is Near The Thurmond Dam-Holding Back A Lake With 1200 Miles Of Shoreline Flowing Toward The Savannah River Nuclear Plant-The Vogtle Nuclear Plant Was About Ground Zero But No Damage Reported-Whew

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savannah_River

Savannah River Augusta Canal Riverwatch Pkwy 2.jpg

This will not be reported on major news channels, however  Lake Strom Thurmond, also known as Clarks Hill Lake in Georgia, is a reservoir at the border between Georgia and South Carolina in the Savannah River Basin. It was built between 1946 and 1954 by the Army Corps of Engineers at the confluence of the Little River and Savannah River. At 71,000 acres (287 km²), it is the 2nd largest artificial lake east of the Mississippi River. It was a shallow quake about 3 miles deep (the worst kind as far as damage goes). And it is reported to be 5.4, not 4.4 in magnitude. Make no mistake about it, failure of the Strom Thurmond Dam will place the Savannah River Power plant under a tidal wave and obliterate it.

This lake encompasses 1200 miles of shoreline and 71,100 acres of water. It dams some 120 miles of smaller lakes. Should the dam have been effected by the recent earthquake a virtual tidal wave would have swept down the Savannah River over the Savannah River Nuclear power plant and large areas of the south would soon have resembled Fukushima. The dam is two miles up river from Augusta Georgia and should it go, there will be no more Augusta, Georgia. At present the report is no damage as usual. Nothing to worry about until the next eruption of the New Madrid which has occurred every 200 years and is … well overdue.

http://enenews.com/emergency-response-plan-activated-after-massive-crack…

COLUMBIA GENERATING STATION FINAL SAFETY ANALYSIS REPORT (pdf), Dec. 2011: Grand Coulee Dam is ~250 river miles upstream from the CGS nuclear reactor, while the Wanapum Dam is ~60 river miles from the reactor and ~30 river miles from the Hanford Nuclear Reservation.

Wanapum Dam

Emergency plan activated after ‘massive’ crack found in dam near nuclear site — Official: ‘Serious problem’; Failure risk ‘sufficiently high’ — NOAA: “Potential for rapid increase in flows” — Gov’t: Flooding could release radioactive waste from Hanford (VIDEO)

There are many nuclear reactors within the reach of a Yellowstone Super Volcano  eruption. Yellowstone has been showing some unusual signs lately.

The last eruption of a super volcano was in Toba, Sumatra, and 75,000 years ago. It had 10,000 times the explosive force of Mount St. Helens and changed life on Earth forever. Thousands of cubic miles of ash were thrown into the atmosphere, so much that it blocked out light from the sun all over the world. Two thousand five hundred miles away 14 inches of ash coated the ground. Global temperatures plummeted by 21 degrees. The rain was so poisoned because of the gasses that it turned black and strongly acidic. Mankind was pushed to the edge of extinction; the population forced down to just a couple of thousand people worldwide. Three quarters of all plants in the Northern Hemisphere were killed.

yellowstone-exploding-gif

TV: Radioactive waste containers may be “smashed and opened” after roof collapse at leaking U.S. nuclear site — Official: We believe there’s been a breach… “It’s a very serious thing” — ‘Seismic event’ mentioned — High levels of alpha and beta radiation detected Carlsbad Nuclearstorage facility roof caves in.

A major catastrophe was avoided here in 2011, one that could have destroyed the American GMO cornbelt.

Reblogged

coyoteprime-runningcauseicantfly

 “The Fort Calhoun Nuclear Power Plant:

Fukushima in Nebraska?”

Raging Flood Waters Threaten Nuclear Catastrophe

by Kurt Nimmo

“Once again, the corporate media is ignoring a potentially deadly nuclear situation, this time right here in the United States. The Fort Calhoun Nuclear Power Plant in Nebraska is now inundated with flood water from the Missouri River. A berm protecting the plant collapsed on Sunday. Prior to the failure of the berm, there was a fire at the facility. The official story was that the fire was contained in an electrical switchgear room. The plant serves as the storage site for 20 years worth of spent fuel rods from plants in the state in addition to one third of the rods that were removed during a recent refueling. In 2006, the site began storing spent fuel rods above ground in mausoleum-like concrete structures outside the nuclear plant. Omaha Public Power says the spent fuels rods will be stored on-site forever. In addition, in 2009, the Fort Calhoun Nuclear Power Plant was considered an alternative fuel rod storage site to Yucca Mountain in Nevada. In 2010, Congress failed to fund Yucca Mountain after more than $9 billion was squandered building concrete tunnels and chambers designed to keep waste safe for at least a million years

Officials at the Nebraska plant insist the fuels rods are safe. “There is no water inside the plant. The reactor is covered with borated water. The spent fuel is covered with borated water, which we want it to be. That’s intentional. That’s where it should be. The floodwaters are outside Fort Calhoun, not inside,” Gary Gates, CEO of the Fort Calhoun plant, told CNN.

Gates did not address the very distinct possibility that the plant may soon be completely overwhelmed by water from the Missouri River. Due to an unprecedented amount of flood water, the failure of an upstream dam at Fort Peck Dam could lead to a domino-like collapse of five earthen downstream dams, swamp the nuclear power plant, and knock out the generators now used to cool the fuel rods. “The Fort Peck Dam is built with a flawed design that has suffered a well-known fate for this type of dam — liquefaction — in which saturated soil loses its stability,” Bernard Shanks wrote on June 7. “Hydraulic-fill dams are prone to almost instant collapse from stress or earthquakes. California required all hydraulic-fill dams be torn out or rebuilt — and no other large dams have been built this way since.”

Can we trust nuclear power officials to tell us the truth? The Fukushima disaster was worsened considerably by the cover-ups and lies of government and industry officials. Should we expect the same here in the United States?

“Ft. Calhoun Equals About 20 Fukushimas”
by Zen Gardner

“MSNBC apparently had a picture of the Ft. Calhoun nuclear plant taken today AFTER the ‘water dam’ – barely visible surrounding the reactor and main control buildings in this photo taken on June 24 – burst. But that page is now ‘page not found’. I’ll guess that when the aqua dam burst, the control room was flooded. They are saying “no problem, there is no danger”- but, of course, there IS a problem.

The REASON there is a problem and why they aren’t telling the truth is because, while Fukishima is equivalent to about twenty Chernobyls, Ft. Calhoun is equivalent to about twenty Fukushimas. Not because it has a lot of reactors – or even a very big one. But because it is holding an immense amount of nuclear fuel in its cooling pool. This isn’t some elevated bathtub like the cooling pools at Fukushima. Oh, no. This cooling pool is forty feet UNDER GROUND AND forty feet ABOVE GROUND. It’s EIGHTY FEET DEEP IN TOTAL. If they can’t cool it, the corn belt is in trouble.

I’m guessing that it’s the big rectangular building behind-left (actually touching) the round nuclear reactor containment building. Why do I think that? Because it has no windows or ventilation and it’s about the only building on-site large enough to hold the amount of spent nuclear fuel it has to hold – and, by the way, it was filled up to capacity in 2006 – which is why they had to start storing the excess spent fuel rods in those concrete dry casks outside of the pool. But I could be wrong. If I am, please send me a diagram – not an opiniongram. The dry casks are visible near the top of the picture. They are grey concrete blocks set together on the large, grey square area. The casks have white doors facing a little to the left in the photo. The NRC says there is ‘no problem’ should the casks become partially submerged by Missouri flood waters.

The back-up generators are probably flooded as well. They were ALSO what the rubber dam was in place to protect. Even if they aren’t, there is water in the electrical system. That’s what the yellow cards from the NRC were about last year – and those cards were never signed off as safe. There are at least six and probably dozens of NRC and government people there ‘closely monitoring’ the plant. All they can do is watch. The ’emergency’ plans were only thought up when the water started rising and were only implemented beginning on June 6. Before then, the plant owners were still pissing back and forth with the NRC that a flood that bad couldn’t happen. And the brilliant rubber condom around the plant didn’t just burst by itself. The dumbasses were piddling around and managed to pop it themselves!

So, when they tell me there is no danger at all, I know otherwise because the rubber dam was the last resort…and that ANY water higher than that is too much – and the water was clearly VERY high up on it when it burst. I’m thinking that if I call another disaster, and it happens, it will start getting dicey in about sixty-four hours. From now.”

http://www.rense.com/general94/newst.htm

__________________________________________________________________________________

woman-screaming

Other spectacular possibilities from our planners.

The Fort Peck dam was moved six inches during the last flooding of the Mississipi River. If it goes the other dams below will also be washed out and all of the nuke plants below it go causing many fukushimas. Gravity fill dams are unsafe and have been replaced in California. The Mississippi River basin provides a bit more of a challenge when it comes to replacing dams.

Other spectacular possibilities

http://enenews.com/gundersen-ft-calhoun-nuclear-plant-melted-down-operators-forced-nrc-make-enhancements-before-major-flooding-video

Nuclear Engineer: Ft. Calhoun nuclear plant “likely would have melted down” if operators were not forced by NRC to make enhancements before major flooding (VIDEO)

The nuclear Fort Calhoun power plant in Nebraska had flood waters surrounding it at that time. Now it seems that NRC whistleblowers are warning of dam failures and the potential for Fukishima like conditions her in the United States if something is not done.

In July 2011 with the flood waters along the Missouri River still rising around Nebraska’s Fort Calhoun nuclear power station, David Loveless, a NRC Senior Reactor Analyst concluded in a post-Fukushima technical review for the flood analysis at the nuclear power stations, that the reactor would not survive the gross failure of the Oahe dam—one of six dams on the Missouri River upstream from the nuke. Loveless cites analysis that a dam break would hit the reactor on the Missouri River with a wall of water knocking out electrical power systems and water pumps vital  for reactor cooling.  The group, Clean Nebraska, has recently written to NRC Chairwomen Allison Macfarland in an appeal to not allow the restart of the reactor pending a full investigation.

Then in September 2012, Richard Perkins, an Nuclear Reactor Regulations engineer and the lead author of “Flooding of U.S. Nuclear Power Plants Following Upstream Dam Failure,” asked the agency’s Office of Inspector General to investigate his allegations that the NRC “staff intentionally mischaracterized relevant and noteworthy safety information as sensitive, security information in an effort to conceal the information from the public”  where “agency records that show the NRC has been in possession of relevant, notable, and derogatory safety information for an extended period but failed to properly act on it. Concurrently, the NRC concealed the information from the public.”

Perkins further charges that his concerns regard a government deliberate cover-up and violation of law involving fraudulent safety claims to surrounding communities and their representatives.

“Another NRC anonymous whistleblower, drew even more attention to risk of nuclear accidents following dam failure to the Oconee reactor in Senecca, South Carolina, stating, “The probability of Jocassee Dam catastrophically failing is hundreds of times greater than a 51 foot wall of water hitting Fukushima Daiichi,” the engineer said. “And, like the tsunami in Japan, the man-made ‘tsunami’ resulting from the failure of the Jocassee Dam will –- with absolute certainty –- result in the failure of three reactor plants along with their containment structures.”

http://www.beyondnuclear.org/nuclear-power/2012/10/11/nrc-whistleblowers-warn-of-nuclear-accidents-caused-by-dam-f.html

http://twelfthbough.blogspot.com/2011/06/no-room-for-error-means-plenty-of-room.html

Mountain Sinking South Of Lake Powell Dam, Storage Basin Of The Colorado River, 2nd Largest Man Made Lake In The World

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A subject touched on previously

There is a mountain sinking in Page Arizona, 120 feet of road has collapsed. Page is just south of the lake Powell Dam a huge lake which would put 12 to 15 feet of water across the imperial valley and Yuma Arizona which lies near the San Andreas fault line. I used to tell those boys in Yuma to find a way out of there. When a mountain is sinking in front of a lake this wide it is never good. This was a controversial project to begin with and gave rise to the environmental movement.

It is fortunate the levee break at Hamburg, Iowa on the Missouri River was below Omaha, Nebraska as the power generating plant near there is already being sandbagged against flooding.
The best advice at this time is probably to pray there are no earthquakes along the New Madrid fault and drop any preconceived notions that we are not entering uncharted territory.
(Sorry make it Bernard) Shanks warns there could be a flood of biblical proportions should the Fort Peck Dam give way.

Cayce  said basically a new Pacific coast will stretch along the base of the Rocky mountains. Interestingly Edgar Cayce known as the sleeping prophet predicted the imperial valley will fill with water. Nobody paid much attention to that. Lake Powell can do just that! Lake Powell is the upper storage basin of the Colorado River and has 2000 miles of shore line. The Glen Canyon recreational area encompasses over 1 million acres. Lake Powell is the second largest “man made” lake in the world and reaches 186 miles across the Red Rock Desert.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Powell http://www.cityofpage.org/

http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/esp_cayce.htm

http://www.americansouthwest.net/utah/glen_canyon/lake_powell.html

http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/sitchin/esp_sitchin_3i.htm

http://beforeitsnews.com/earthquakes/2013/03/arizona-sinkhole-mountain-sinking-2451204.html

S.O.T.T.

http://aadivaahan.wordpress.com/2012/05/07/the-year-the-time-and-the-place-of-our-dam-ming/

The Aswan Dam is also unfortunately a gravity fill as Fort Peck in the United States.

In Egypt we see much caution when it comes to becoming involved in wars in that area of the world. Egypt is home to the Nile River and the Aswan Dam. It is a gravity fill dam and as such is very dangerous and prone to failure. An earthquake or “missile” against this dam would submerge large areas of Egypt and result in the destruction of it’s economic base. Unknown to most Americans, the Fort Peck Dam is also gravity filled and was moved forward 6 inches by the flooding on the Missouri a couple of years ago. Should it break, most dams on the Mississippi would give way insuring the almost total destruction of America.

“The Aswan Low Dam or Old Aswan Dam is a gravity masonrybuttress dam on the Nile River in AswanEgypt. The dam was built at the former first cataract of the Nile, and is located about 1000 km up-river and 690 km (direct distance) south-southeast of Cairo. Constructed between 1899 and 1902, it was intended to reduce flooding and to support population growth in the lower Nile. The dam provided inadequate flood protection and was raised twice, between 1907–1912 and 1929–1933.”

The Year, The Time and the Place of our Dam-ming…

800px-aswan_low_dam2-jpg

Other problem areas are the Mosul Dam not only due to loss of life but chaos in the area could hinder shipment of oil and that is the stuff that makes the engines run and the wheels turn.

The first is the Mosul Dam, which stretches across the Tigris River in a valley north of Mosul, Iraq. As dams go, this one is a civil engineering horror. The dam was captured on Aug. 7 by the Islamic State, and retaken 10 days later by Iraqi and Kurdish forces, with American air support.

Should the two-mile-wide dam fail, which is likely, Mosul would be wiped out and the damage would extend to Baghdad. Loss of life could reach 500,000, and millions could be deprived of water and power: an immense catastrophe piled on the daily pain of Iraq.

The second dam, in southern Africa on the Zambezi River, is the Kariba. This 55-year-old dam, by some measures, is the world’s second largest. It was a civil engineering masterpiece and has held up well, given the spotty maintenance by its owners – Zambia, on the north bank and Zimbabwe, on the south bank.

But the Kariba Dam is predicted to fail within three years unless it undergoes massive repair. If it does, surging water would rip a vast trench down the length of the Zambezi River on its route to the Indian Ocean. The wall of water would take out another giant dam, Cahora Bassa, in Mozambique.

http://oilprice.com/Alternative-Energy/Hydroelectric/The-Worlds-Most-Dangerous-Dams.html

The Fort Peck Dam

Shanks says hydraulic gravity filled dams are prone to destruction, liquefaction an collapse. It is a flawed design.

An interview with Shanks and an article by him
from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch are below:

The looming Missouri dam flood

By Bernard Shanks | Posted: Tuesday, June 7, 2011 12:00 am

There is very real threat of a flood that will leave St. Louis in chest-high water. The reason: Six old, huge, faulty dams that normally have reserve space for spring snow melt are nearly full now — before the spring floods start. Floodgates that haven’t been opened in 50 years have begun to open. Flooding has begun. And the human and economic toll could be ghastly.

Why another flood disaster? Six dams from Fort Peck in Montana to Gavins Point in South Dakota, authorized by the Flood Control Act of 1944, are in the process of failing at flood control. With spring water levels low, they can hold back more than three years of average Missouri River flow — enough to stop the worst floods and protect 750 miles of the Missouri River valley and heartland cities. This year, that is not the case.

Let me give you a sense of scale. These reservoirs are massive. Four of the nation’s 10 largest reservoirs are along the Missouri River — Fort Peck, Fort Randall, Garrison and Oahe. Three of these had less than five feet of total storage space behind the floodgates at the end of May. With a combined height of 700 feet, these three dams are nearly full. Melting snow surely will complete the task.

With cities from Wolf Point, Mont., to St. Louis facing record levels of water, hundreds of thousands of people are threatened by the unprecedented opening of floodgates. The greatest fear is the massive Fort Peck Dam, a hydraulic-fill dam that is the largest of its kind.

The Fort Peck Dam is built with a flawed design that has suffered a well-known fate for this type of dam — liquefaction — in which saturated soil loses its stability. Hydraulic-fill dams are prone to almost instant collapse from stress or earthquakes. California required all hydraulic-fill dams be torn out or rebuilt — and no other large dams have been built this way since.

At three miles wide, Fort Peck Dam last opened its floodgates 36 years ago. By the end of the first week in June, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will be releasing a record spill of water. The corps recently answered the question of possible failure with a statement the dam is “absolutely safe.” It may be the largest at-risk dam in the nation.

Downstream, Garrison Dam never has had to use its floodgates since the dam was constructed 50 years ago. By mid-June, the corps plans to dump water equal to a good-sized river. The same is true for Oahe Dam, the next one downstream. Since the reservoirs are nearly full, the corps has no choice.

Effective flood control from six large dams is no longer an option. As a corps representative said, “It now moves us into uncharted territory.”

We must all pose a question of national significance to the corps: What if Fort Peck Dam should fail?

Here is a likely scenario: Garrison, Oahe and three other downstream earthen dams would have to catch and hold a massive amount of water, an area covering nearly 250 square miles 100 feet deep. But earthen dams, when overtopped with floodwater, do not stand. They break and erode away, usually within an hour. All are full.

There is a possibility a failure of Fort Peck Dam could lead to a domino-like collapse of all five downstream dams. It probably would wreck every bridge, highway, pipeline and power line and split the heartland of the nation, leaving a gap 1,500 miles wide. Countless sewage treatment plants, toxic waste sites and even Superfund sites would be flushed downstream. The death toll and blow to our economy would be ghastly.

Years after Katrina and the New Orleans levee breaks, professional engineers and a federal court judge ruled the Corps of Engineers was to blame.

Are we once again at the brink of a massive corps failure? The corps is infamous for management errors, caving to commercial pressure and losing sight of its primary mission. This pending threat is so huge that it is gambling with the nation’s security.

The corps is placing the nation at risk, and if the dams fail, Leon Panetta, who will become secretary of Defense later this month, will have the great Missouri Flood Disaster on his desk. And the entire nation will demand answers as to why the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers did not avert disaster with more economically and ecologically sound methods of flood prevention.

Bernard Shanks, an adviser to the Resource Renewal Institute, has studied the six main-stem Missouri River dams for more than four decades. He has worked for the U.S. Geological Survey and served as director of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. He has written three books on public land policy and is completing a book on the hazards of the Missouri River dams.

Copyright 2011 STLtoday.com. All rights reserved.

http://www.stltoday.com/news/opinion/article_2b1eeca2-e701-51dd-83c2-f7bcc81845a4.html

http://www.scribd.com/doc/57465620/Bernard-Shanks-Flood-Risk-Editorial

 

 

 

 

Of course an earthquake along the New Madrid fault would be a nightmare when it comes to nuclear plants as well as gas, oil and water pipelines which cross the Mississippi as well as bridges which carry the 3 day food supply. Many suggest the explosion could be seen from outer space.

Sinkholes forming on the New Madrid Fault

BlackSwan5

Due to the irresponsible positioning of various nuclear facilities in proximity to earth quake faults, it is a question of when not if America becomes uninhabitable. So yes there are many things which could result in what some term a black swan event.

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Tecumseh

“The Sacred Mother is screaming for life and the meteorites will hear her cries and answer her call for help. They will hit the earth from the heavens with such force that many internal things will happen as well as external. The earth will move as a result of the impact. This will cause the sacred fire that is the source of all life to the Mother to move through her body. She is like a Great Bird within the egg, trying to crack out… “

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One Response to The World’s Most Dangerous Dams With Spectacular Possiblities From Our Planners Hovering Above Nuclear Plants

  1. flyingcuttlefish says:

    Reblogged this on The Louisiana Sinkhole Bugle and commented:
    This is for Walter ….

    Like

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